Digging In

Find your place on the planet. Dig in, and take responsibility from there.

-Gary Snyder

The science is in: communities worldwide are feeling the effects of global climate change. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC):

Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and since the 1950s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, sea level has risen, and the concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased. 1IPCC, Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. P. 6. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, U.K. Retrieved from www.ipcc.ch

As a father, citizen, and educator, I am concerned about how the places I love will weather the turbulent times ahead. We must remain mindful that global climate change is a humanitarian and ecological disaster that could have largely been mitigated had we the political will.

But there is also hope. The concurrent phenomena of global climate change and the inevitable transition away from fossil fuels are forcing us to rethink how we live, work, and play in Wisconsin, my place on the planet. Consequently, we have an opportunity to re-envision how we want our communities to operate. I believe we have an obligation to do this in ways that attend to social and environmental justice so that all might thrive. To that end, I pursue the following questions in this blog:

  • What new knowledge and skills will be necessary for those of us in Wisconsin to build our communities’ capacity for resiliency to global climate change and energy transition?
  • How do we do we build resilience in such a way as to allow all inhabitants of our communities, human and non-human alike, to thrive in an era of climate instability and transition?

As I explore these questions, I hope to highlight organizations, communities, and individuals who are engaged with resiliency work right here in Wisconsin and the upper Midwest.Time to dig in.

References   [ + ]

1. IPCC, Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. P. 6. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, U.K. Retrieved from www.ipcc.ch

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